example of marginalization is the marginalization of women

Marginalization Of Women Synonymswith free online thesaurus, antonyms, and definitions

Marginalization of Aboriginal Women

Sadly, this Doodle is seen only in the blue places below, i.e., Canada. It’s the first one-country Doodle I’ve seen, and that’s a shame. It does us well to remember the indignities suffered not all that long ago by women in academia, and to mourn the loss of scientific advances caused by the marginalization of women. Wikipedia gives the evidence (my emphasis)

It’s “Trump uses abusive tactics and reinforces marginalization of women with children by yelling at mother of young baby.”

A Brief History of the Marginalization of Aboriginal Women in Canada

This issue was inspired by a lazy afternoon and a recent episode of Oprah: which I admit to with more than slight embarrassment. The episode was about the "Marginalization of Women" to use Oprah's terminology. Guests included Karrine Steffans (The author of Confessions of a Video Vixen), Pink talking about her new song Stupid Girls, Ariel Levy (The author of Female Chauvinist Pigs), a recruiter for Girls Gone Wild on spring break and the resident psychologist Dr. Robin. My chagrin is not due to the fact I was sucked into the pop culture phenomenon that is the Oprah show, but due to the fact that she initiated a conversation that we should be engaged in as sexual violence professionals and advocates. My first thought was that we should be leading the conversation. I wanted to hear the debate spill out of conference rooms, rape crisis centers, shelters and lecture halls and onto the small screen not the other way around.

Explaining the Marginalization of Women in Legislative Institutions Yann P

The Decalogue is a case in point. "You shall not covet your neighbor's house, you shall not covet your neighbor's wife, or his male slave, his female slave, his ox, his donkey or anything which belongs to your neighbor" (Exodus 20:17; Deuteronomy 5:21). Because the Ten Commandments are so well known, it's quite easy to miss the assumptions in them about gender. But the marginalization of women is clear. The wife is classified as her husband's property, and so she's listed with the slaves and work-animals. There's also a striking omission in this commandment: never does it say "You shall not covet your neighbor's husband." The Ten Commandments were written to men, not women. There's even more evidence, linguistic in nature. Hebrew has four distinct forms of the word "you" and these are gender and number specific. The form of "you" in every single commandment is masculine singular. The text assumes its readers are men. True, mothers are mentioned in the Decalogue as deserving of honor, but even here the Hebrew grammar assumes a male readership: the Hebrew verb for "honor" is masculine singular (Exodus 20:12; Deuteronomy 5:16). The Ten Commandments embody much that is foundational for modern society, but egalitarian they aren't.

the marginalization of women permeates almost every aspect of our


Today, most women in the society are faced with numerous challenges and problems. Some of the major challenges that women face in the society today include gender discrimination and marginalization. Despite various calls by human rights activists and non-governmental organizations to abolish and eliminate discrimination and marginalization of women, there are still numerous reports that indicate that women are highly marginalized in the present society.Through marginalization, the society often sets certain limits which an individual can reach or achieve, for example in the workplace, women have been marginalized towards top managerial positions or executives positions in most large organizations. The society believes that men can serve well as senior managers or chief executive officers than women. Due to this assumption, women who might be more qualified than their male counterparts may not be recruited for executive positions in most large organizations because they are viewed as poor managers or inferior beings. In February 2010, Oprah Winfrey stated in her television talk-show, The Oprah Winfrey Show that approximately one hundred thousand women in United States of America have been marginalized from various white-collar jobs and executive positions in most large organizations, including state corporations. Marginalization of women in the workplace has resulted into increased discrimination of women in the workplace.Augusta National Golf Club finally accepts its first women members, and so a Leviathan of gender discrimination at long last makes a move in the right direction. Conversely, Todd Akin falsely states that a woman's body has biological mechanisms to prevent pregnancy in cases of something he refers to as "legitimate rape." One step forward, two steps back in our battle for women's rights. Sadly though, the marginalization of women has been going on for a long time. Some 2,000 years ago, a Hebrew sage named Ben Sira wrote "the birth of a daughter is a loss" and "better is the wickedness of a man than a woman who does good." Modern readers rightly label such words misogynistic. But they're part of the historical record and Ben Sira wasn't alone. From Mesopotamia to Egypt, women in the ancient world were considered property -- valuable property, but property nonetheless. And it's true of the Bible's view as well. Yes, there were biblical women who flourished in spite of the patriarchy, women like Ruth, Esther, Lydia and Priscilla. But women in the Bible were normally viewed as second class, if even that.Augusta National Golf Club finally accepts its first women members, and so a Leviathan of gender discrimination at long last makes a move in the right direction. Conversely, Todd Akin falsely states that a woman's body has biological mechanisms to prevent pregnancy in cases of something he refers to as "legitimate rape." One step forward, two steps back in our battle for women's rights. Sadly though, the marginalization of women has been going on for a long time. Some 2,000 years ago, a Hebrew sage named Ben Sira wrote "the birth of a daughter is a loss" and "better is the wickedness of a man than a woman who does good." Modern readers rightly label such words misogynistic. But they're part of the historical record and Ben Sira wasn't alone. From Mesopotamia to Egypt, women in the ancient world were considered property -- valuable property, but property nonetheless. And it's true of the Bible's view as well. Yes, there were biblical women who flourished in spite of the patriarchy, women like Ruth, Esther, Lydia and Priscilla. But women in the Bible were normally viewed as second class, if even that.Moreover, marginalization of women has also resulted into dominance of men in the workplace. Today, many powerful positions in most large organizations are dominated by men due to marginalization of women from holding such positions. In my opinion, this has resulted into gender discriminations in the workplace, inadequate utilization of the abilities and capabilities of women and gender imbalance at the workplace. Additionally, most women who get discriminated at the workplace based on their gender often get demoralized and discouraged from working. Consequently, they develop low self-esteem, lack of self-confidence and lack of intrinsic motivation, hence may perform poorly at the workplace. This finally results into reduced productivity at the workplace which negatively affects the society as a whole. Marginalization of women in the society has also resulted into reduced number of female role models within our communities. In extreme cases, women who are leadership positions may also be demoted or dismissed from their employments without any solid reason.The Decalogue is a case in point. "You shall not covet your neighbor's house, you shall not covet your neighbor's wife, or his male slave, his female slave, his ox, his donkey or anything which belongs to your neighbor" (Exodus 20:17; Deuteronomy 5:21). Because the Ten Commandments are so well known, it's quite easy to miss the assumptions in them about gender. But the marginalization of women is clear. The wife is classified as her husband's property, and so she's listed with the slaves and work-animals. There's also a striking omission in this commandment: never does it say "You shall not covet your neighbor's husband." The Ten Commandments were written to men, not women. There's even more evidence, linguistic in nature. Hebrew has four distinct forms of the word "you" and these are gender and number specific. The form of "you" in every single commandment is masculine singular. The text assumes its readers are men. True, mothers are mentioned in the Decalogue as deserving of honor, but even here the Hebrew grammar assumes a male readership: the Hebrew verb for "honor" is masculine singular (Exodus 20:12; Deuteronomy 5:16). The Ten Commandments embody much that is foundational for modern society, but egalitarian they aren't.