what is the future demand for a pediatrician? | Yahoo Answers

The AAP said there would be an increased demand for pediatricians, specialists in particular.

Huge demand for Pediatricians in India - Vidya | 6TV

Background: Japan has been witnessing a considerable rise in the number of children presenting with psychosomatic disorders. Thus, there is a mounting demand for pediatricians to be trained in the caring of children with psychosomatic disorders.

Adding to the demand for pediatricians, Ventosa noted that there are many new families from the gas and oil industry in the area seeking the services of a pediatrician.

Pediatrician | Pediatrics - Doctor On Demand

The medical and science fields are always changing and always evolving. As the medical field continues to make new and exciting discoveries in medicine and pediatrics, the demand for pediatricians will increase. These pediatricians will be needed to oversee new scientific studies centered on children’s diseases and finding cures. Due to this, the career outlook for pediatrics not only will continue to develop in medical facilities such as hospitals, but also in research facilities.

Pediatrician - Healthcare Careers

The AAP concludes that there is currently a shortage of pediatric medical subspecialists in many fields, as well as a shortage of pediatric surgical specialists. In addition, the AAP believes that the current supply of primary care pediatricians is inadequate to meet the needs of children living in rural and other underserved areas. In the future, more primary care pediatricians will be needed to care for the increasing number of children who have significant chronic health problems and who will require more medical and surgical care from pediatric physicians throughout their childhood. In addition, there will be an increased demand for general pediatricians because of the decrease in the number of family physicians providing care for children and the limited number of nonphysician clinicians interested in pediatric careers. Other factors that are expected to increase the demand for general pediatricians include changes in physician work hours and implementation of current health reform efforts that seek to improve access to comprehensive patient-centered care for all children in a medical home. Thus, although primary care pediatrics is currently experiencing sustained interest as a career pathway, many factors reviewed in this statement lead to the conclusion that the United States must increase the number of general pediatric residency program graduates to increase the supply of pediatric medical subspecialists and maintain the current supply of primary care pediatricians. Payment structures should be revised to allow pediatric physicians to provide quality care to all children, including the increasing number of children with chronic health conditions. Without adequate payment, general pediatricians are unable to provide the full range of services needed for optimal child health within a patient-centered medical home, and recruiting physicians into medical fields that focus on children will remain challenging because of payment inequities. The AAP maintains that current health care reform efforts that seek to improve access to comprehensive, patient-centered care for all children cannot be successful without an adequate pediatrician workforce to provide such care. All adults once were children, and healthy children who grow to be productive adults are critical to our nation's growth. Therefore, the provision of optimal care to the nation's children is an investment in our nation's future. On the basis of review of these known and evolving factors, the AAP is committed to the following:

It takes a long time to become a pediatrician, ..


As we advance into the future, there will always be changes that will occur. Such as now, and the past, clinics and hospitals are different than how they were in the past. Since technology is advancing, everything is changing into highly advanced materials and equipment. Now, hospitals have advanced equipment that years ago never existed. Currently a person could go through an MRI scan and get a full scan from head to toe. Thanks to the advanced equipment that we have today, we have higher chances of discovering possible cures for diseases or deadly illnesses. The medical field will always be around. Thanks to the great demand for pediatricians, anyone, either male or female, has the same opportunity to become a doctor.The medical and science fields are always changing and always evolving. As the medical field continues to make new and exciting discoveries in medicine and pediatrics, the demand for pediatricians will increase. These pediatricians will be needed to oversee new scientific studies centered on children’s diseases and finding cures. Due to this, the career outlook for pediatrics not only will continue to develop in medical facilities such as hospitals, but also in research facilities.Li: Luckily, CHCMU currently is the largest training base for talented pediatricians in China. In my lecture, I introduced the history of the transfer from “Department of Pediatrics” to “Research Direction of Pediatrics under the Subject of Clinical Medicine” in our university. In fact, training of young pediatricians has a long history in our hospital. We maintain a sufficient demand for pediatricians. Today there are over 500 pediatricians in CHCMU, and 400 new beds have been established. According to the stimulation of the Ministry of Health, 200 doctors will be enough for 1,000 beds, maintaining a ratio of 1:0.2. So the number of stall members is not a problem in our hospital.The iSeek website, Minnesota's career portal, reports that while demand for pediatricians varies somewhat with national birthrates, it doesn't typically lessen demand dramatically. That's because some decades have more people being born than other decades who will require pediatric care for 10 to 15 years. If the birthrate drops, pediatricians will still have children older than 10 to take care of. The iSeek website predicts that demand for pediatricians won't decrease because the U.S. population is growing, with people continuing to have babies. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics also notes that the growing population will increase the need for medical care. For physicians and surgeons overall, which includes pediatricians, the bureau predicts that employment will grow 24 percent between 2010 and 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Some states provide population growth information and prospects for pediatricians on their website. Illinois, for example, expects faster-than-average employment growth through the year 2018 for pediatricians, with about 40 pediatrician openings expected annually in the state.Many hospital regions in the United States lack pediatric medical subspecialists and surgical specialists, and primary care pediatricians report difficulty obtaining pediatric medical subspecialty and surgical specialty care for their patients. The shortage of mental health subspecialists (eg, child psychiatrists, developmental/behavioral pediatric specialists) is especially critical, because it is estimated that approximately 21% of children in the United States meet criteria for a mental health disorder. It is imperative, therefore, that GME funding initiatives designed to increase interest in primary care do not erode entry into pediatric medical subspecialties and surgical specialties. Health policy changes designed to address the shortage of primary care physicians for adults by dissuading entry into adult subspecialties should not be extended to pediatrics. In addition to geographic disparities in the availability of pediatric medical subspecialists, there is wide variation in both the supply and demand among the various pediatric medical subspecialties. For example, the population-weighted average distances to care range from 15 miles for a neonatologist to 78 miles for a pediatric sports medicine specialist. In addition, data from 2003 to 2006 suggest that increases in the number of pediatric medical subspecialists may not address maldistribution, because pediatric medical subspecialists and surgical specialists tend to enter practice where similar physicians already practice, with few entering new markets. Thus, increased GME funding for pediatric medical subspecialty training should be targeted to the subspecialties experiencing the greatest shortages and incentivize subspecialty practices that provide care for children who are currently underserved by subspecialists, including children living in poverty as well as those living in small and rural communities., Without increases in GME funding, the current shortage of pediatric medical subspecialists is likely to worsen. Pediatric medical subspecialists also spend less time than generalists in direct patient care, averaging 33.7 hours per week for those working full-time and 21 hours per week for those working part-time, compared with an average of 42 hours per week for full-time generalists and 25.7 hours per week for part-time generalists. Because most pediatric departmental teaching faculty members at academic centers are pediatric medical subspecialists, a shortage of pediatric medical subspecialists not only affects patient care but also adversely affects the ability to train pediatric residents and conduct research. Indeed, a sufficient number of academic pediatric physician faculty members in all medical and surgical disciplines is required to adequately train the future pediatrician workforce, and the demand for academic pediatricians is likely to increase with the increase in primary care training positions and medical school enrollment.